Friday, 8 July 2016

A story of fate, faith, and love that lasts forever (Book Review: Elaine Pinter's Eternal Mercury)

Eternal Mercury


Title: Eternal Mercury
Author: Elaine Pinter


Eternal Mercury is an emotionally charged story of love.

It begins with the word 'Perfect'. That's how Chelsee Taylor describes her life as the book begins. She is about to graduate from high school, her childhood friend Max is now her boyfriend, and her life ahead is all figured out.

In the beginning, even as Chelsee describes her 'perfect' life, as she tells that she is always smiling, as she explains the heady feeling she gets every time Max kisses her, surprisingly, it doesn't read as a cheesy account coming from the inexperience and illusions of youth.
Rather there is a serenity that rings true.

Eternal Mercury has a short preface that describes an accident.
Thanks to this preface, the author manages to keep you on tenterhooks despite this serenity, waiting for that crash to happens.

It starts as a sweet story of young love, and moves on to one of loss and pain.
When Max dies and Chelsee can still feel his presence, the story moves to another level. One where as a reader, you wonder about whether what Chelsee is describing is true, or is she just not able to let go of Max's memories.
It's heart-rendering to read about Chelsee searching for the 'Max Feeling', which she can feel occasionally.

The concept of Mercury woven into the emotions of this story is very interesting.
"You can only see it right before sunrise or right after sunset and it's always low on the horizon. It's elusive like that because it's so close to the sun, but it's always there, eternally, even when the conditions aren't right to see it."

I have to say that I did figure out the twist in the story sometime before it was actually revealed.
"It's amazing how fate gives you exactly what you need at just the right moment."

Eternal Mercury is divided into two parts. Book one is from Chelsee's perspective and book two from Blake's. 
I loved reading Book one. And some parts of Book two, just because the other portions are already familiar to me as I have read about them in Book one.

I enjoyed Eternal Mercury. A story of fate, faith, and love that lasts forever.
"Trust fate. Live life. Finish well."

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The italicized text in quotation marks are quotes from the book.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.




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   Eternal Mercury by Elaine Pinter Chelsee Taylor has been in love with her boyfriend, Max, since they started kindergarten together. She has no idea that high school graduation will be the last perfect day of her life. After a tragic car accident, she refuses to accept Max's death because she can still feel his presence. No one believes her and she is completely alone. But all of that changes the moment she meets Blake Andersen. It's not just that he believes her . . . or even just that he's so understanding . . . but why is Max's presence so strong when she's with Blake? Eternal Mercury is two intertwined books in one. Book one follows Chelsee’s bittersweet journey and book two uncovers Blake’s story of redemption. In the end, it is Max who will inspire them both to trust fate, live life, and finish well. amazon Praise for Eternal Mercury “Overall, this novel made me really think about how life can change so completely in the blink of an eye. It was an amazing, life altering story.” “I loved this book. It made me laugh and cry but most of all it made me feel like there is always hope in this world.” “I could not put this down. What an amazing story of love, tragedy, strength, triumph, and family.”




Guest Post: Eternal Mercury, Organ Donation, and Cellular Memory When I first realized that I wanted to write a book, I knew that I wanted it to be different. Shortly after I began brainstorming for that unique idea, a car-crash scene on a mountain highway started playing in my head. Not only was I looking for a unique story idea, but I was also looking for a positive message. I began to wonder if, instead of something scary like a ghost, could something good be left after someone died? The answer became clear to me: organ donation. What could be more beautiful than that? And what could be more romantic than true love that could survive the boundaries of death? To my surprise, the idea turned out to be more realistic than I expected. Through research I discovered the phenomenon of cellular memory. Cellular memory is when people who receive transplants take on traits of people whose organs they receive. It’s rare, but when it does happen, it can come in the form of food cravings, changes in musical taste or hobbies, and sometimes even glimpses at other things about the donor. Although the level of cellular memory I portrayed in Eternal Mercury is fictional, the need for organs definitely isn’t. It’s hard to think about death, and the common misconceptions about organ donation don’t help. But by understanding the facts and then making your decision known, you just might be able to bring something good out of the bad. That part of Eternal Mercury isn’t based on fiction. Here are the facts: Over 100,000 people, including kids, are in need of transplants. Over 20 of them die waiting each day. One person can save up to seven lives by donating their heart, liver, kidneys, lungs, pancreas, and small intestine. That same person can improve the lives of many others through the donation of tissues such corneas, skin, veins, tendons, ligaments, and bones. You won’t receive less medical care if you decide to become a donor. Doctors and nurses make every possible effort to save their patients’ lives and will not even consider organ donation unless a person dies. Income, social status, and race are not factors in deciding who receives organ transplants. You’ll be helping people who need it the most and your family will not be charged for the procedure. Most major religions support organ donation. I’m not sure that there could be a more loving or selfless gift, but don’t be afraid to check with your spiritual advisor. Almost anyone can be an organ donor. Age and/or medical history don’t necessarily disqualify you. The most important thing you can do is let your family know whether or not you want to be an organ donor. No matter what you decide, telling your family will save them from the pain of trying to guess your wishes at a time when that’s the last thing they need. And if the choice is right for you, to let someone else continue on when you’ve reached the end down here, don’t think about what it means for you; instead think of the incredible gratitude you’d feel if someone did it for you or someone you love.

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   Elaine

Author Elaine Pinter Elaine Pinter lives in Boise, Idaho with her husband and son. When she’s not hanging out with them, she’s jotting down ideas for her next novel in the tattered notebook she carries everywhere. Her writing journey began in June of 2012 when a reading spree set off an unexpected chain of events. After poring over the pages, her own ideas began to appear and she found herself glued to her laptop after her family went to bed every evening. The late nights continued until her first two YA romance novels, Eternal Mercury and Between the Starlight, were published. She’s one of those hopeless romantics who believes love always wins and that the best stories are the ones that drag you through the tears and reward you with a smile when all the pieces fit together perfectly in the end.
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2 comments:

  1. Nimi, I am truly grateful for your review - thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was a pleasure reading and reviewing Eternal Mercury. So, thanks to you too :)

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