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Book Review - Hopebreaker (Dean F. Wilson)







Title : Hopebreaker (The Great Iron War - Book One)
Author: Dean F. Wilson
Genre: Science Fiction/Fantasy










Altadas is a world where human race is facing extinction. Demons - who look like humans, which makes fighting them more difficult - are taking over. A world where 'light is dangerous and Hope is an enemy'.
The Regime of Demons is being opposed by the rebel Resistance.

Jacob is a rebel at heart, who consciously chooses not to take sides. But life has other things in store for him.
He continues to hold on to his his sense of humour and rebellion against authority of any sort even in most difficult of situations. This adds a light touch to even the on-the-edge situations.

'Sometimes there were little victories to be had in the smallest acts of rebellion... There were greater victories when those small acts of rebellion were noticed by the tyrants.'

Jacob's repartees are fun to read, and give a lighter touch in this story set in a world which is struggling to survive.

'The problem with lies was that truth always got in the way.'
These words are used in a different context in the book, but they ring as true for the way Jacob keeps convincing himself that he doesn't care to be a part of the fight against Demons, and how his actions speak differently.

Fantasy as a genre usually works for me because anything is possible. It is not limited by the need to be conceivable factually. On the other hand, the writing has to engross the reader enough to make it a believable world.

The narrative of Hopebreaker is effortless and the descriptions are visually potent.

'Even when silence returned from wherever it sought refuge, the sounds continued to echo in all minds'

The book begins with enough mystery to grab attention instantly and keeps the curiosity high. The good guy is in trouble and that keeps the pages turning fast.

An effective facet that the author has given to the world of Altadas is the names that things have.
The currency is 'coils'... it coils itself around the heart. Money does that.
Iron is the 'black gold'... representative of a world which has no place for beauty and aesthetics.
'Hope' is the name given to what needs to be destroyed. And that makes the situation gloomier.

There is much about the stories of the characters that is hinted at, but not revealed completely. So, I will look forward to the next book in the series.


Click for 5 Reasons to read 'The Great Iron War - Book 2'

(The words in Italics are quotes from the book)

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Blurb
In the world of Altadas, there are no more human births. The Regime is replacing the unborn with demons, while the Resistance is trying to destroy a drug called Hope that the demons need to survive.

Between these two warring factions lies Jacob, a man who profits from smuggling contraceptive amulets into the city of Blackout. He cares little about the Great Iron War, but a chance capture, and an even more accidental rescue, embroils him in a plot to starve the Regime from power.

When Hope is an enemy, Jacob finds it harder than he thought to remain indifferent. When the Resistance opts to field its experimental landship, the Hopebreaker, the world may find that one victory does not win a war.






About the Author:




Dean F. Wilson was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1987. He started writing at age 11, when he began his first (unpublished) novel, entitled The Power Source. He won a TAP Educational Award from Trinity College Dublin for an early draft of The Call of Agon (then called Protos Mythos) in 2001.

He has published a number of poems and short stories over the years, while working on and reworking some of his novels. The Call of Agon is his first published novel.

Dean also works as a journalist, primarily in the field of technology. He has written for TechEye, Thinq, V3, VR-Zone, ITProPortal, TechRadar Pro and The Inquirer.

Contact the Author:




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