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F.T. Camargo - Shanti and The Magic Mandala (Book Review)
















Shanti and The Magic Mandala
F.T. Camargo




Namaste - 'The God who dwells in me greets the God who dwells in you.'

Good and Evil. Angels and Satan.
Fighting since time immemorial.

Shanti and the Magic Mandala is the story of the 'chosen ones' and their crusade against the 'darkness'.
The six chosen ones' different cultures and religions, brighten the narration of this adventurous fantasy.

Legends, Magic, Faith and Destiny merge to pave way for the future in this tale that inspires belief in goodness.

Shanti and the Magic Mandala is not just a fantasy. Each of the six teenagers - the chosen ones - have unusual passions. They are curious and they share their knowledge.
Through their conversations and their experiences, this book is a trove of discoveries. But it doesn't read like a book that is imparting information.
Through the words of Shanti and the Magic Mandala is conveyed the enthusiasm of Shanti, Antonio, Nasir, Helena, Itai and Tadao.
This enthusiasm is catching. As a reader, you enjoy the thirst and fervour of the Shanti and the Magic Mandala's Brave Six.

Although there are shadowy, mysterious figures on the cover, it still has a calm feel to it. The cover is a coming together of many symbols. The book is strong in symbols and their interpretations too.

The descriptions of Shanti and the Magic Mandala are visually stimulating. A beautiful scenic word picture is the beginning of the book. And the words continue to paint engaging pictures through the book.

The six teenagers have unusual passions. They are confident in their own skin despite the fact that they don't gel with others their age. For me this is another good reason for this book to be read.

F.T. Camargo's Shanti and the Magic Mandala has depth of symbolism, the strength of faith and the

At a time, when the world is so scary and there are times when it does seem that the darkness is taking over everything, Shanti and the Magic Mandala is about hope - Hope of connected destinies and common aims, despite distinct ambitions and individual beliefs.

*  *  *


About the Book:




Shanti and the Magic Mandala is an adventure in which fantasy and reality are mingled. The book tells the story of six teenagers, from different religious and cultural origins and different parts of the world, who are mystically recruited to form two groups - one in the Northern Hemisphere, and one in the Southern. They eventually gather in Peru, and through a single alliance, begin a frantic chase for the sacred object that can stop the black magician's final plan.

Awards & Recognition for the Book:
- Winner of 2014 London Book Festival in the category “Young Adult”.
- 2014 Moonbeam Children's Book Awards: Bronze Medal at “Young Adult Fiction – Spirituality” category
- 2014 New England Book Festival in Boston:  Honorable Mention in the category “Young Adult”.
- Winner of 2015 Paris Book Festival in the category “Young Adult”.
- Winner of 2015 International Book Awards in the category “Fiction / Young Adult”.
- Winner of 2015 New York Book Festival in the category “Young Adult”.
- 2015 Los Angeles Book Festival – Runner-up in the category “Young Adult”.
- 2015 San Francisco Book Festival – Runner-up in the category “Young Adult”.
- 2015 DIY Book Festival in Los Angeles: Honorable Mention in the category “Young Adult”.

About the Author:
F. T. Camargo is an Italian Brazilian living in Sao Paulo, Brazil. An award winning architect and author, he also studied Arts and Media and has a post degree in Economics and MBA in e-commerce. He is a vegetarian because of his love for all animals and has been deeply involved in causes for their protection and freedom. He is a world traveler adventurer, outdoor sports lover, speaks 4 languages and has published a travel book “Rio, Maravilha!”
For many years he has been practicing yoga and meditation and studying the Kabbalah. His exploration of spiritual teachings motivated a commitment to self-development which in turn created a new path and goal in life. Shanti and the Magic Mandala was born from his inner journey.

Contact the Author:

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